Frankie Jean-Gagnon

I joined the Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board team as a wildlife biologist in September 2017. I am working on management policies of various marine species with a focus on ringed seal and bowhead whale, as well as migratory birds and fisheries.

As a graduate student, I worked on the impacts of changing sea ice conditions on the reproduction and migration of eider ducks breeding in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. Through these projects, I worked closely with the communities of Coral Harbour and Cape Dorset in Nunavut. I became aware of the importance of Inuit knowledge on wildlife in contributing to the protection and the conservation of northern species, and developed an interest in collaborative work balancing Inuit participation, science and policy. Involving youth in different opportunities related to wildlife and environmental research and monitoring projects also occupied an important place in my work.

 

Academic background: MSc in Wildlife and Habitat Management (Université du Québec à Rimouski; UQAR); Graduate Diploma in Wildlife and Habitat Management (UQAR); BSc in Geography (UQAR)
Contact information: [email protected]

 

The Wildlife Biologist supports the Executive Director and the Wildlife Management Director in carrying out the activities of the NMRWB.

 

Elizabeth Laura Kokkinerk

The Administrative Assistant provides essential administrative support to all of the other staff members, and is responsible for maintaining an organized and coordinated office.

Mark Basterfield

As the director of wildlife management with the Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board, I work on conservation and management policy on a wide diversity of species including shrimp, migratory birds, beluga, polar bears, and bowhead whales.

My graduate work focused on the spatial ecology of a small population of caribou in southeastern Manitoba. Through this project I became aware of and interested in the important connections between caribou and the history and future of many Indigenous people. After finishing my thesis I began work with the Health, Environment, and Indigenous Communities Research Group at Trent University. Working together with Inuit elders and knowledge holders, we developed projects focused on Inuit Knowledge of wildlife as it relates to conservation, Inuit culture, lifestyle, and economy.

My work with the Board began in February 2016 as a wildlife biologist, and I’ve enjoyed the consistent challenges, the diverse nature of the work and learning from Nunavimmiut. It has been a true privilege working with some of the world’s most amazing wildlife species, and with the people who best know and understand them. For me, the most rewarding (and challenging) part of working with the NMRWB is collaborating with co-management partners to develop creative wildlife conservation and management solutions which honour the traditions and rights of Nunavik Inuit.

 

Past and current research projects: Habitat selection of woodland caribou on a managed landscape: The Owl Flintstone Herd; Torngat Mountains Caribou Herd Inuit Knowledge; Culture, and Values Study; Nunavik Inuit Knowledge Polar Bear Study
Project locations: Manitoba; Region of Nunavik; Nain, Nunatsiavut
Academic background: MSc in Environmental and Life Sciences (Trent University); BSc in Conservation Biology (Trent University)
Contact information: [email protected]

 

The Director of Wildlife Management oversees all aspects of wildlife management including: review of scientific and technical submissions to the Board; providing scientific/technical advice to the Board; and directing and administering the NMRWB wildlife research responsibilities.  The Director is also responsible for the management of the NMR Wildlife Research Fund (NMRWRF), as well as being the main person designated by the NMRWB to act on its behalf on various wildlife management committees and organizations.

 

Annie Weetaluktuk Rousseau

I grew up going to our family camp for 4 months every year as a child. I used to hunt and fish a lot with my father and loved it and now I work with the Inuit hunters and I’m still loving it. I work closely with Nunavik Anguvigaapiit (LNUKS) and Anguvigait (RNUKS).
My Previous employment was at the Girls Unit as an Educator, I took the girls out fishing and took them for excursions both in summer and winter, teaching them traditional skills and life skills. At the Women’s shelter as the Executive director, I took the ladies and children out for excursions and worked with them socially.

The Wildlife Liaison Officer has the important task of coordinating information between the NMRWB and its staff and the LNUKs, RNUK, and local communities.

Kaitlin Breton-Honeyman

I have been with the Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board (NMRWB) for over four years as a Wildlife Biologist first, and then became the the Director of Wildlife Management from November 2015 to Fall 2019. I live in Inukjuak with my partner and young daughter and son. I was fortunate to work with Nunavik communities during my graduate studies, where much of my research involved learning from the knowledge and experience that Inuit Elders and hunters have of beluga whales. I am deeply honoured and grateful for the privileged of working together with different partners and communities to improve our collective understanding of species and the environment that sustains us all.

Tommy Palliser

Tommy was born in Moose Factory, Ontario in 1975. He grew up in the community of Inukjuak, previously known as Port Harrison. Tommy has acquired a Social Sciences Diploma at John Abbott College and a Bachelor of Commerce Degree from Concordia University. After returning from his studies in the south, Tommy worked in Economic Development at the Kativik Regional Government. There, he assisted many small business start-ups and other economic development projects in the region of Nunavik for 14 years from 2002 to 2016, including the creation of the Unaaq Men’s Association of Inukjuak, which he strongly believes in to support the cultural development of the youth in his community through various traditional skills training development.

He presently is the Executive Director of the Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board and looks forward to assisting in the management of the marine resources in close collaboration with the Inuit and other partners in Nunavik. The Executive Director is responsible for day-to-day administration of the NRMWB, including the handling of finances, the organization of meetings, and interactions between the NMRWB, communities, and other organizations.